kitchen designs layouts

Kitchen Designs Layouts

Home Plan Your SpaceWork Triangle & Kitchen LayoutsKitchen Layouts Kitchen Layouts Overview Work Triangle Kitchen Layouts Getting Started With Kitchen Layouts In larger kitchens, an island (or two) can break up the space in attractive ways, help direct traffic, provide convenient storage, and present the chef with useful countertop work space that borders (but does not block) the work triangle. For good traffic flow, islands should have at least 3 or 4 feet of aisle on each side. A small peninsula may be a good alternative to an island in kitchens where space is limited. Never put an island in a kitchen where two points of the work triangle are on opposite walls; it will get in the way. As you move items around in the plan, always remember your work triangle. Basic Kitchen Layouts There are four main kitchen layouts: “Galley,” “L,” “U,” and “G” (Peninsula). Each accommodates a work triangle in its own way. Galley L-Shaped U-Shaped G-Shaped (Peninsula) Efficient, but counter space is limited and foot traffic can be disruptive. Popular. No foot traffic crosses through work triangle. Lots of counter space. Surrounds the cook with appliances and counter space. Ideal for an island if the “U” is big enough. Cozy. Lots of counter space. Links the kitchen to the dining area with a common counter surface. Build Your Own Now that you’ve seen some of the options available, you can design your own kitchen with our helpful Start Your Floor Plan tool. Start Your Floor Plan Now
kitchen designs layouts 1

Kitchen Designs Layouts

BHG.com Kitchens Kitchen Layouts Kitchen Layouts A kitchen layout is more than a footprint of your kitchen—it’s a blueprint for how your kitchen will function. In general, there are three types of kitchen layouts: U-shape, L-shape, and galley kitchens, plus various combinations of each. An open kitchen layout employing any one of the three standard layouts is another popular option. In this configuration, the kitchen faces another area of your home or is completely incorporated into another room. Functionality trumps all other choices you will make regarding your kitchen’s layout. Pay special attention to how work areas in the kitchen relate to each other, and keep the work triangle principle in mind when deciding where to place appliances and cabinets. Aisle space, traffic flow, and counter space are other considerations to address, along with existing factors in the room such as doors and windows. Interestingly, size is not always a factor in narrowing down your choice of layout. True, a galley layout with its narrow corridor is likely to be the best bet for small kitchens, but this layout also works well in large kitchens. Both the U-shape and L-shape kitchen layouts allow you to leave the center of the kitchen open for a table or island. Facebook Pinterest Twitter Google Plus Email
kitchen designs layouts 2

Kitchen Designs Layouts

Kitchen Layouts Overview Work Triangle Kitchen Layouts Getting Started With Kitchen Layouts In larger kitchens, an island (or two) can break up the space in attractive ways, help direct traffic, provide convenient storage, and present the chef with useful countertop work space that borders (but does not block) the work triangle. For good traffic flow, islands should have at least 3 or 4 feet of aisle on each side. A small peninsula may be a good alternative to an island in kitchens where space is limited. Never put an island in a kitchen where two points of the work triangle are on opposite walls; it will get in the way. As you move items around in the plan, always remember your work triangle. Basic Kitchen Layouts There are four main kitchen layouts: “Galley,” “L,” “U,” and “G” (Peninsula). Each accommodates a work triangle in its own way. Galley L-Shaped U-Shaped G-Shaped (Peninsula) Efficient, but counter space is limited and foot traffic can be disruptive. Popular. No foot traffic crosses through work triangle. Lots of counter space. Surrounds the cook with appliances and counter space. Ideal for an island if the “U” is big enough. Cozy. Lots of counter space. Links the kitchen to the dining area with a common counter surface. Build Your Own Now that you’ve seen some of the options available, you can design your own kitchen with our helpful Start Your Floor Plan tool. Start Your Floor Plan Now
kitchen designs layouts 3

Kitchen Designs Layouts

Kitchen Layouts A kitchen layout is more than a footprint of your kitchen—it’s a blueprint for how your kitchen will function. In general, there are three types of kitchen layouts: U-shape, L-shape, and galley kitchens, plus various combinations of each. An open kitchen layout employing any one of the three standard layouts is another popular option. In this configuration, the kitchen faces another area of your home or is completely incorporated into another room. Functionality trumps all other choices you will make regarding your kitchen’s layout. Pay special attention to how work areas in the kitchen relate to each other, and keep the work triangle principle in mind when deciding where to place appliances and cabinets. Aisle space, traffic flow, and counter space are other considerations to address, along with existing factors in the room such as doors and windows. Interestingly, size is not always a factor in narrowing down your choice of layout. True, a galley layout with its narrow corridor is likely to be the best bet for small kitchens, but this layout also works well in large kitchens. Both the U-shape and L-shape kitchen layouts allow you to leave the center of the kitchen open for a table or island.
kitchen designs layouts 4

Kitchen Designs Layouts

Overview Work Triangle Kitchen Layouts Getting Started With Kitchen Layouts In larger kitchens, an island (or two) can break up the space in attractive ways, help direct traffic, provide convenient storage, and present the chef with useful countertop work space that borders (but does not block) the work triangle. For good traffic flow, islands should have at least 3 or 4 feet of aisle on each side. A small peninsula may be a good alternative to an island in kitchens where space is limited. Never put an island in a kitchen where two points of the work triangle are on opposite walls; it will get in the way. As you move items around in the plan, always remember your work triangle. Basic Kitchen Layouts There are four main kitchen layouts: “Galley,” “L,” “U,” and “G” (Peninsula). Each accommodates a work triangle in its own way. Galley L-Shaped U-Shaped G-Shaped (Peninsula) Efficient, but counter space is limited and foot traffic can be disruptive. Popular. No foot traffic crosses through work triangle. Lots of counter space. Surrounds the cook with appliances and counter space. Ideal for an island if the “U” is big enough. Cozy. Lots of counter space. Links the kitchen to the dining area with a common counter surface. Build Your Own Now that you’ve seen some of the options available, you can design your own kitchen with our helpful Start Your Floor Plan tool. Start Your Floor Plan Now
kitchen designs layouts 5

Kitchen Designs Layouts

A kitchen layout is more than a footprint of your kitchen—it’s a blueprint for how your kitchen will function. In general, there are three types of kitchen layouts: U-shape, L-shape, and galley kitchens, plus various combinations of each. An open kitchen layout employing any one of the three standard layouts is another popular option. In this configuration, the kitchen faces another area of your home or is completely incorporated into another room. Functionality trumps all other choices you will make regarding your kitchen’s layout. Pay special attention to how work areas in the kitchen relate to each other, and keep the work triangle principle in mind when deciding where to place appliances and cabinets. Aisle space, traffic flow, and counter space are other considerations to address, along with existing factors in the room such as doors and windows. Interestingly, size is not always a factor in narrowing down your choice of layout. True, a galley layout with its narrow corridor is likely to be the best bet for small kitchens, but this layout also works well in large kitchens. Both the U-shape and L-shape kitchen layouts allow you to leave the center of the kitchen open for a table or island.
kitchen designs layouts 6

Kitchen Designs Layouts

Common Kitchen Layouts One-Wall Kitchen Galley U-Shape U-Shape & Island G-Shape L-Shape L-Shape & Island Deciding on a layout for a kitchen is probably the most important part of kitchen design. It’s the layout of the kitchen—and not its color or its style—that determines how easy it is to cook, eat and socialize in the kitchen. At the most basic level, the layout addresses the placement of the appliances, the sink(s), the cabinets, the counters, the windows and doors, and furniture such as a kitchen table and chairs. If you’re building a new home or adding on, you have the luxury of choosing the layout that works best for you and your family. If you’re remodeling, the structure of the existing home will limit the options. The most common kitchen layouts include the one-wall kitchen, the galley kitchen, the U-shaped kitchen, the G-shaped kitchen, and the L-shaped kitchen—some of which can also incorporate an island. Read on to find out the pros and cons of each option, as well as some tips for coping with the layout you already have.

Kitchen Designs Layouts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *