diy outdoor kitchen ideas

Diy Outdoor Kitchen Ideas

Kitchens are the undisputed heart of the home, where everyone gathers, mingles, and lingers during parties. But to achieve that kind of appeal outside means expanding your outdoor living space. To draw a crowd—and keep them entertained—requires a bit more than plopping down a table and a few plastic chairs. With an outdoor kitchen you can prepare meals and be around your guests with minimal time spent running back inside for plates, beverages, or tongs. Although you could spend tens of thousands of dollars for a custom outdoor kitchen, a basic island is an efficient design that leaves out the complexity of curves and angles. Not only that, with an island guests can relax on one side while you’re cooking on the other, so you feel as though you’re part of the gathering. Since durability is such a critical issue for an outdoor kitchen, stone veneer is a low-maintenance option that won’t need painting or sealing. Real stone is heavy, expensive, and requires the experience of a mason. Cementitious cultured stone, such as the type used in this project from Landmark Stone, is easier to work with because it’s lighter, cuts faster, and lasts just as long as the real thing—all while looking as natural as real stone. Follow along as This Old House senior technical editor Mark Powers builds a simple frame, covers it in faux stone, and then nestles a gas grill in the center to get the party started.
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Diy Outdoor Kitchen Ideas

With an outdoor kitchen you can prepare meals and be around your guests with minimal time spent running back inside for plates, beverages, or tongs. Although you could spend tens of thousands of dollars for a custom outdoor kitchen, a basic island is an efficient design that leaves out the complexity of curves and angles. Not only that, with an island guests can relax on one side while you’re cooking on the other, so you feel as though you’re part of the gathering.
diy outdoor kitchen ideas 2

Diy Outdoor Kitchen Ideas

Giant fireplaces flanked by leather chairs, 35-foot counters, mosquito misters and outdoor air-cooling systems that rival the chilliest movie theater: Mike Logan ‘s clients have included “everything under the sun” in their upscale outdoor kitchen designs. But the builder says there are still plenty of possibilities for people with more modest budgets.
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Diy Outdoor Kitchen Ideas

Step One // How to Build an Outdoor Kitchen Overview to Building a Better Barbecue Illustration by Gregory Nemec Building this open-air kitchen takes some time, but with the right planning you can do it in two weekends. As long as you get to the point of coating the frame and lath in a layer of mortar, you can essentially tarp over the top of it and take your time applying the finish decoration. Once you get the counters on it, you can go ahead and use it, working on the stone veneering over time. The kitchen consists of a stainless-steel grill set into a 3-foot-long stone-veneered plywood base and flanked by two more 4-foot bases with cabinets below and 48 linear inches of countertop on each side—one with a working sink. The countertop – here it’s concrete, but it can be any kind of stone—sits 38 inches from the ground, which is a comfortable height for both food prep and elbow propping. It rests on a gently sloped concrete slab to help prevent water from pooling around the bottom, but any structurally sound existing patio would work as a base. The island’s frame is made out of pressure-treated 2x4s and 3/4-inch plywood – an inexpensive and durable construction that’s easier to work with than concrete block. The frame consists of three small, manageable boxes that are built separately and then screwed together to make one long island: one 24-inch-high, 37-inch-wide box in the center to support the grill and the shelf it sits on, plus one 36-inch-high, 48-inch-wide box on either side, with cabinets set into each. This layout allows you to scale the island’s length to fit your patio or adjust it to incorporate a built-in bar with a 90-degree turn. Because the boxes are empty, they can accept steel doors, drawers, or other storage compartments or conceal a propane tank for a gas grill. The outside of the island is veneered with cultured stone, which is lightweight and easy to put on with mortar. Use stones that complement your home’s architecture or existing stonework – round fieldstones evoke a classic New England farm wall, while thin, horizontal stones have a more modern look. Arranging the stone in an aesthetically pleasing way is like doing a big jigsaw puzzle. Speed up the hunt for the perfectly sized stone by first unpacking and organizing all the pieces into piles of corners, shorts, longs, and rectangulars. This ensures you’ll have on hand a random range of colors, mimicking real stone, and keeps you from rummaging through boxes and chipping the pieces.
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Diy Outdoor Kitchen Ideas

“You can get as basic as you want as long as you follow a few rules as you try to save money,” says Mike, owner of Texas Pit Crafters in Tomball, Texas. “First, never build an outdoor island from combustible materials, including plywood countertops covered with tile. Second, when you’re laying out your design, factor in some usable counter space no matter how small your outdoor space will be. You can’t have grills and sinks butting up against each other with nowhere for you to work.”
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Diy Outdoor Kitchen Ideas

To save money in the long term, remember that outdoor furniture needs care and replacement parts. “Look for a 15-year warranty on metal furniture and buy from a good outdoor furniture store, not a ‘big box’ place,” says Linda. “That way you can get the pieces repaired or replace the slings or strapping instead of having to buy all-new furniture every time something breaks.”
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Diy Outdoor Kitchen Ideas

How to Build an Outdoor Kitchen Shopping List 1. Cultured stone to veneer the kitchen box. Available at home centers and stone yards. You will need a few boxes of corner pieces, as well as flat face pieces, sold by the square foot. Get about 10 percent more than you need to account for trims, cuts, and broken pieces. 2. Pressure-treated 2x4s to build the frame for the box. You will need 15 to 20 10-foot pieces. 3. 3/4-inch pressure-treated plywood to sheathe the frame. Get four 8-by-4-foot sheets. 4. 2½-inch ceramic-coated deck screws to hold the frame together. 5. 2-inch ceramic coated deck screws to attach the plywood to the frame. 1¼-inch ceramic coated deck screws to build plywood boxes for the cabinets. 6. Construction adhesive.7. Metal post standoffs to act as feet and raise the frame off the ground, preventing moisture from wicking up into the wood. You will need a total of 12. 8. 15-pound builder’s felt to provide a moisture barrier between the mortar and the wood. 9. ½-inch staples 10. Wire lath to create a base on which the mortar hangs. 11. Stainless-steel roofing nails to attach the lath to the plywood. 12. Type S mortar (or one labeled “for veneer stone”) to affix the stone to the box. Get four or five 80-pound bags. 13. Stainless-steel doors (optional) to finish cabinets. Make sure they come on a face frame. ×
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Diy Outdoor Kitchen Ideas

How to Build an Outdoor Kitchen Shopping List 1. Cultured stone to veneer the kitchen box. Available at home centers and stone yards. You will need a few boxes of corner pieces, as well as flat face pieces, sold by the square foot. Get about 10 percent more than you need to account for trims, cuts, and broken pieces. 2. Pressure-treated 2x4s to build the frame for the box. You will need 15 to 20 10-foot pieces. 3. 3/4-inch pressure-treated plywood to sheathe the frame. Get four 8-by-4-foot sheets. 4. 2½-inch ceramic-coated deck screws to hold the frame together. 5. 2-inch ceramic coated deck screws to attach the plywood to the frame. 1¼-inch ceramic coated deck screws to build plywood boxes for the cabinets. 6. Construction adhesive.7. Metal post standoffs to act as feet and raise the frame off the ground, preventing moisture from wicking up into the wood. You will need a total of 12. 8. 15-pound builder’s felt to provide a moisture barrier between the mortar and the wood. 9. ½-inch staples 10. Wire lath to create a base on which the mortar hangs. 11. Stainless-steel roofing nails to attach the lath to the plywood. 12. Type S mortar (or one labeled “for veneer stone”) to affix the stone to the box. Get four or five 80-pound bags. 13. Stainless-steel doors (optional) to finish cabinets. Make sure they come on a face frame.
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Third, says Mike, if your outdoor kitchen will be any significant distance from the indoor kitchen, allow at least a small budget for adequate storage space for frequently used items like grill brushes, forks, spices and paper towels. “You don’t want to spend the whole time running back and forth,” he says.
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Step Three // How to Build an Outdoor Kitchen Sheathe the Frame Photo by Wendell T. Webber Screw the three boxes together side by side. Flip the frame over and screw a metal post standoff to the bottom of each post to act as feet. Using a circular saw, cut plywood panels to fit the dimensions of the frame. Run a bead of construction adhesive along the posts and stretchers. Lay the plywood over the adhesive and screw it to the 2x4s with 2-inch deck screws. Leave openings in the sheathing to match any cabinet openings. For the cabinets, create boxes out of plywood to fit within the depth of the framing. Hold them together with construction adhesive and 1¼-inch deck screws. Build in a 1-inch-wide, 1¼-inch-deep flange around the front of each box. Set the boxes aside.

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